Brooke Adams (actress) Biography, Age, Husband, Actress, Movies

Brooke Adams Biography

Brooke Adams is an American actress best known for her roles as Abby in Days of Heaven (1978), Elizabeth Driscoll in Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978) and also Sarah Bracknell in The Dead Zone (1983).

Brooke Adams Age

Brooke Adams was born on February 8, 1949 in New York City, U.S. He is 70 years old as of 2019.

Brooke Adams Family

Brooke was born to Rosalind (née Gould), an actress, and Robert K. Adams, who was a producer, actor, and also a former vice president of CBS. He was also a descendant of presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams.

Her sister is actress Lynne Adams who played Leslie Jackson Bauer Norris Bauer from 1966 to 1971 and again from 1973 to 1976 on The Guiding Light.

Brooke Adams Tony Shalhoub | Brooke Adams Tony Shalhoub Wife | Brooke Adams Shalhoub | Tony Shalhoub And Brooke Adams |

Brooke married fellow actor Tony Shalhoub in 1992. In 1993, the couple purchased a home in Los Angeles. They listed the home for sale in 2016.

Brooke Adams

Brooke Adams

Brooke Adams Baby | Brooke Adams Josie Lynn Shalhoub | Brooke Adams Sophie Shalhoub

Adams had adopted a daughter Josie Lynn (born 1989) at the time of their wedding, whom Tony then adopted. Adams and Tony adopted another daughter, Sophie (born 1993).

Brooke Adams Education

Brooke attended the High School of Performing Arts and then the School of American Ballet, and in her youth took dance classes at her aunt’s studio in Montague, Michigan.

Brooke Adams Actress | Actress Brooke Adams

After he played roles in television and low-budget films such as Shock Waves, Brooke appeared in Days of Heaven (1978) and also the remake of Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978). She has also starred in the films Cuba (1979), The Dead Zone (1983), Key Exchange[6] (1985), and Gas Food Lodging (1992).

Adams appeared in the romantic comedy Made-Up in 2002, which was written by her sister, actress Lynne Adams, and then directed by her husband, Tony Shalhoub. Brooke also appeared in the films At Last and also The Legend of Lucy Keyes (both 2005), starred on Broadway in The Cherry Orchard, Lend Me a Tenor, Wendy Wasserstein’s The Heidi Chronicles (1990), and then guest-starred on Monk.

Adams served as an official judge for the 3rd annual Noor Iranian Film Festival in Los Angeles in 2009.

Brooke Adams Braindead

Brooke plays U.S. Senator Diane Vaynerchuk in the potitical satire science fiction comedy drama television series Brain Dead.

Brooke Adams Movies

Year

Title

Role

2017

Breakable You

Ruth Frank

2009

Gary’s Walk

Marcia

2008

The Accidental Husband

Carolyn

2006

The Legend of Lucy Keyes

Samantha Porter

2004

At Last

Carol Singleton

2003

Party Animals

Celeb Mother

2002

Made-Up

Elizabeth James Tivey

1995

The Baby-Sitters Club

Elizabeth Thomas Brewer

1992

Gas Food Lodging

Nora

1991

The Unborn

Virginia Marshall

1987

Man on Fire

Jane

1985

Almost You

Erica Boyer

The Stuff

Special guest star in Stuff commercial

Key Exchange

Lisa

1983

Utilities

Marion Edwards

1983

The Dead Zone

Sarah Bracknell

1980

Tell Me a Riddle

Jeannie

1979

The First Great Train Robbery

(uncredited)

A Man, a Woman and a Bank

Stacey Bishop

Cuba

Alexandra Lopez de Pulido

1978

Days of Heaven

Abby

Invasion of the Body Snatchers

Elizabeth Driscoll

1977

Shock Waves

Rose

1976

Car Wash

Terry

1974

The Great Gatsby

Party Guest (uncredited)

The Lords of Flatbush

(uncredited)

1971

Murders in the Rue Morgue

Nurse (uncredited)

Brooke Adams TV Shows

Year

Title

Role

2016

BrainDead

Senator Diane Vaynerchuk

2012

Hemingway & Gellhorn

Madrid woman

2009

Monk

Edith Capriani

2008

Monk

Leigh Harrison

Law & Order: Special Victims Unit

Margo

2007

Monk

Sheriff Margie Butterfield

2005

Monk

Mrs. Abigail Carlyle

2002

Monk

Leigh Harrison

1997

Gun

Joyce

1996

Wings

Mary

1995

Frasier

Marilyn (voice)

1994

Picture Windows

Probable Cause

Touched by an Angel

Susana

1993

The Last Hit

Anna

1991

Sometimes They Come Back

Sally Norman

1991

thirtysomething

Bree Ann Pratt

1989

Bridesmaids

Pat

1988

Moonlighting

Terri Knowles

1987

Paul Reiser Out on a Whim

The Lion of Africa

Grace Danet

1986

American Playhouse

Julia Newell

1985

Lace II

Pagan Tralone

1984

Lace

Jennifer ‘Pagan’ Trelawney

Special People

Diane Dupuy

American Playhouse

1981

Great Performances

1978

Family

Lizzie

1977

Family

Lizzie

Nero Wolfe

Sarah Dacos

1976

Police Woman

Angela

James Dean

Beverly

The Bob Newhart Show

Mitzi Margolis

Kojak

Julie Winston

1975

Who Is the Black Dahlia?

Diane Fowler

Song of the Succubus

Olive Deems / Gloria Chambers

Black Bart

Jennifer

Murder on Flight 502

Vera Franklin

1974

F. Scott Fitzgerald and ‘The Last of the Belles’

Kitty Preston

1965

O.K. Crackerby!

Cynthia Crackerby

1963

East Side/West Side

Marky Morgan

Brooke Adams Facebook

Brooke Adams Twitter

Brooke Adams On Monk

Brooke Adams Interview

20 Questions With Brooke Adams

Published: 

Source: www.americantheatre.org

How did you end up doing Happy Days?
The director Andrei Belgrader has been saying to me for years, “I wanna do Happy Days with you.” Every time I would start to read the script, I’d fall asleep. But Andrei is so brilliant, and everyone thinks Beckett is so brilliant, I figured there must be something in it.

Have you changed your mind about the play?
Yes, since I’ve started to memorize it, I fell in love with it; I think it’s fantastic. And then Tony said he would play Willy, which is a tiny part—I didn’t push him at all, he wants to do it.

You and he have worked together a lot, haven’t you?
Well, I don’t really work that much anymore, but I love to work with Tony. It’s how we met, doing The Heidi Chronicles on Broadway. It revives our romance when we work together.

Do you have ideas about what’s going on in Happy Days—why is Winnie sinking into quicksand, for starters?
I have no idea what’s going on—post-apocalyptic something. I don’t think it matters. It’s really a play about relationships and life and death. This woman is so optimistic, it’s unbelievable.

I heard this guy on NPR talking about plants—he was saying they have 7,000 more genes than we do, and the reason is that they’re rooted to the ground and can’t move, so they need to have more sophisticated receptors and take in everything and respond. I’m thinking Winnie’s like that.

Are you optimistic?
Not like her, no. But I guess I am. I have a lot of sort of—natural faith, not having anything to do with God, but with the idea that things will work out. I guess that’s optimism.

It’s a cliché that laymen ask actors: “How do you memorize all those lines?” But with Happy Days, it’s a real question.
I’m getting it, but it’s definitely a great exercise for my brain. It’s all non-sequiturs for an hour and a half, and it has to be done precisely—it’s not like you can improvise around this stuff. But it tells you everything you need to know, and that’s what’s so great about Beckett. Even though he was obviously kind of mad and obsessed about all these little details, he was right; if you do it just like he wants, it works, and it’s funny.

Your father ran a summer theatre in Michigan. Did he encourage you to pursue acting?
It wasn’t so much that my parents encouraged us; it’s that they didn’t really offer us anything else. This is all my sister Lynne and I knew how to do. We would often be woken up in the morning by auditions, by someone belting out Oklahoma! in the next room. We would spend whole summers hunkered down in the theatre. What could be more fun? Neither my sister nor I went to college; we just went right to work.

But you lived in Spain for part of your 20s.
Yeah, that was kind of my college years, ages 20 to 24. I painted. I lived with a Spaniard, and was kind of a housewife for four years. I had been acting before that—did a TV series when I was 16, and I was at the High School of the Performing Arts. I went to Spain to escape everything, to broaden my horizons and see what I really wanted to do. When I came back I really wanted to act.

Are your own kids interested in performing, and do you encourage their interest?
One of our daughters, Josie, is pursuing it; she went to CalArts to study as an actress. I’d just as soon she didn’t want to be one; it can be so heartbreaking if you don’t make it, and how do you know when you haven’t made it? People stay involved in it way beyond the point of it making sense.

Last good book you read?
Me Before You by JoJo Moyes. Also, the Styrons are friends of ours, and I read Alexandra’s book, Reading My Father, which I really enjoyed.

Do you still paint?
Oh, yes. I had a show last November in Santa Monica. I’ve had shows on Martha’s Vineyard. I’m actually thinking about turning our garage into my gallery and showing there.

Do you think of yourself as retired?
Kind of. But I just can’t stop doing projects. I write, I paint, I do a web series with my sister, I decorate.

Wait, what’s the web series about?
We just finished shooting the first season. It’s about two old women, my sister and me. It’s a post-menopausal Girls.

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